5 Key Learnings That Will Make You A Better Coach

5 Crucial Takeaways From The Go! Chase Excellence In Youth Sports Think Tank 2019

The GO! Chase Excellence in Youth Sports Virtual Think Tank began on 20 March 2019 and ran until 29 March 2019.

All sessions are available until 30 April, 2019.

As it proceeded, I posted a daily summary and review of the Think Tank, focusing on one presentation that I had viewed in the previous 24 hours.

Below is one key takeaway from each of the first five sessions that I reviewed.

Day 1

Session: Building Life Skills With Your Child Through Sport

By Gordon MacLelland

Key Takeaway

We need to change the default adult agenda away from wanting kids to become high performing athletes.

A realistic acceptance that the kids are unlikely to “make it” to the top of their sport will provide more space to focus on the personal benefits and growth that participation in sport can provide. Parents are encouraged to avoid setting up an environment around a child that is entirely focused on the child becoming an elite performer. Rather it is suggested that sport is used to equip kids with positive character traits such as commitment and resilience that will serve them well through life.

To read my full Day 1 review, click HERE.

Day 2

Session: How To Create Momentum In Your Training Sessions

By Dan Cottrell

Key Takeaway

Coaches need to take a step back, be more adaptable and less controlling in their approach to a session.

This involves:

  • Relaxing the focus on achieving session learning objectives. Instead set session themes that link to the season’s learning objectives.
  • Having flexible timings and progressions.
  • Empowering athletes to come up with suggestions and solutions and lead parts of the session.
  • Provide a space in which athletes can make mistakes, discover, and reflect.

Session momentum is most likely achieved when coaches create a learning environment that their athletes love and that the coach loves delivering.

To read my full Day 2 review, click HERE.

Day 3

Session: Coach, Give Me The First Five Minutes Of Practice

By Dr. Joe Eisenmann

Key Takeaway

Fundamental movement skills can and should be included in every session.

This can be done during first 10 minutes of a session by:

  1. Moving in every direction and through every plane of movement.
  2. Accelerating, decelerating and changing direction.
  3. Going through transitions. (e.g. changing from forwards to backwards to lateral skipping).
  4. Experiencing different tempos (e.g. 50% intensity, 75% intensity, etc).

During the last part of the session include a simple 15-20 minute strength routine involving body weight exercises, resistance bands, medicine balls, etc,

To read my full Day 3 review, click HERE.

Day 4

Session: Mental Health – Recognizing It And Becoming Part Of The Solution

By Ashleigh Hopkins & Coach Reed Maltbie

Key Takeaway

Coaches should invest time and energy to engage with kids and learn about their mental state.

Practical tips:

  1. Every session, coaches should work on connecting with your athletes. Check in and see how they are doing.
  2. Learn about mental skills training such as visualisation, thought stopping, etc, through articles, books and metal health professionals.
  3. Don’t try to do it all yourself. Know that they are surrounded by others who can help you. Find a mental health professional such as a sports psychologist who can become a contact and an ally. 

To read my full Day 4 review, click HERE.

Day 5

Session: The Power Of Belonging – Using Positive Discipline Tools To Develop Confident Athletes

By Jane Nelson & Coach Reed Maltbie

Key Takeaway

Treat kids with dignity and respect so that they develop a sense of belonging and a feeling of significance.

When kids feel connected, it is so much easier to provide them with guidance, discipline and instruction because they trust the coach. When kids have a sense of belonging and capability, they are more disciplined, focused and engaged.

Practical Tips:

  1. Always greet kids as they arrive for a session with eye contact, a “high five” or a fist-bump. Welcome kids; invite them in. It will create a feeling of belonging.
  2. Build a sense of significance by giving kids the opportunity to contribute or be responsible. Asking  kids for help can make them feel proud.

To read my full Day 5 review, click HERE.

Summary

The 5 key takeaways were:

  1. We need to change the default adult agenda away from wanting kids to become high performing athletes.
  2. Coaches need to take a step back, be more adaptable and less controlling in their approach to a session.
  3. Fundamental movement skills can and should be included in every session.
  4. Coaches should invest time and energy to engage with kids and learn about their mental state.
  5. Treat kids with dignity and respect so that they develop a sense of belonging and a feeling of significance.

You Can Still Join the Think Tank!

I signed up and I am participated in this fantastic virtual event. The Think Tank sessions are available until 30 April. To register for the Think Tank, click HERE or on the image below, or on any of the links within the post and you will be providing support to Coaching Young Athletes, with no additional outlay to you.Think Tank 2019 Plain

 


If this post helped you please take a moment to help others by sharing it on social media. If you want to learn more I encourage you to leave questions and comments or contact me directly.


20150614_154020-1Darren Wensor is a sports development professional, coach educator, specialist coach of young athletes and founder of the blog coachingyoungathletes.com. Learn more about him here and connect with him on TwitterFacebookLinkedin, Anchor or via email.

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